Safety v. Comfort

IMPORTANT NOTE:. Please note that the office is closed Fridays and Saturdays and for this week- June 15-19.  Due to Covid-19 restrictions and staff shortages, response times will be delayed. Thank you in advance for your patience and understanding. 

Every single day we see some people’s safety being dismissed for other people’s comfort. To honor the inherent worth and dignity of every human being, safety must take precedence over comfort. 

A microcosm of this centers on our church campus.

Our church is the Sanctuary home to Ingrid and the kids. It is also home to the Little Apples Bilingual Learning Center (LABLC) and is used every week by their staff and their families. Amy, our church Administrator, is also required to work from church occasionally. Their safety is essential. 

This is one of the reasons we ask that no one come to the church building or grounds without first notifying staff at least several days beforehand. Please contact Amy, officeuucb@gmail.com or Beth directoruucb@gmail.com to request coming to campus. We will work diligently to keep a calendar that ensures that we are following all safety guidelines and avoiding having too many people in the same space at the same time. If you have been approved to be on campus, honor the requests of those who must be there, like wearing masks and keeping 6’ of physical distance. Ingrid & family, LABLC, and Amy have the right to be safe in their home and/or work environment. 

This is the bare minimum of how to support BIPOC’s right to safety.

This month is handing us many opportunities to create safety over comfort on both small and large scales. Unitarian Universalist association president Rev. Susan Frederick-Gray recently published a message on policing for white UUs. In it, she states: “We can’t reform the current system of policing in America. We must find a new way to keep one another safe.” For many white people, this is a surprising and uncomfortable thought, but it is not new or untested. The resources linked at the end of Rev. Frederick-Gray’s post are a good starting point, as are interviews with author Alex Vitale here and here.  The UUA has also published a guide for churches looking for alternatives to calling the police.

Looking for more opportunities and inspiration? See the previous 2 blog posts: Intersectionality and #BLM for resources and see below for some of this month’s National & Cultural Holidays.